Golden Syrup

Golden Syrup is is a very pleasant tasting thick syrup with a rich unique flavor. It is a byproduct of the refining of cane sugar. It is excellent for cooking and for certain recipes. It is really just another form of ordinary sugar.

It is made up of approximately 56% invert syrup, and 44% sucrose. From this we can deduce its composition, and consequently it's sweetness, glycemic index and calories relative to sugar.

A typical breakdown would be:

Sugar Percentage
Sucrose 44%
Fructose 27%
Glucose 27%
Other 2%

Benefits:
No benefits other then a very pleasant flavor. Like sugar it provides empty calories, it has no nutritional value whatsoever. People do not buy it for its health giving properties. Unlike molasses it has no minerals or vitamins and none of the raw flavor associated with the nutrients in sugar cane.

Uses:
It can be used on it's own to sweeten pancakes etc., but it is very viscous and a little difficult to spread. Generally it is used in cooking such as treacle tart and pudding. But it is also excellent for producing savory dishes and sauces. The most common use is in flapjacks.

Concerns:
It has all of the same problems as sugar, i.e. tooth decay, diabetes, and obesity. It should be counted as part of the daily intake of refined sugar. Nevertheless, it is fine in moderation.

Production:
The sugar cane is boiled and the sugar crystallizes. This is removed and the process repeated. Golden syrup is a byproduct of one stage of this process. Unlike molasses it does not have the minerals or other solids left over, just certain forms of sugar and moisture.

Sold As:
Tate & Lyle's Golden Syrup.

Interesting facts:
It was discovered in 1883 by a Scottish businessman, Abram Lyle, as a byproduct of sugar cane production in his factory in London. It was originally made available to employees and was so popular that it was decided to produce and market it. It proved so successful that it has been on sale ever since. Lyle's packaging has remained almost unchanged since 1885 and now holds the Guinness record as the world's oldest brand.

Approval:
Does not require approval. 



Conclusions and Summary:
Very pleasant syrup that can add flavor, texture and color to food. However it is just another form of refined sugar and care needs to be taken to avoid excessive consumption. Not suitable for diabetics.

Name Calories / Gram Sweetness Index Glycemic Index Calories / Spoon-Equiv
Golden Syrup 4 1.1 60 15

Taste: -------- Good
Aftertaste: ---- No.
Concerns: ----- Yes.




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